Prisoners of War

Phyllis Hershey (Women in World War II)

Photo of Phyllis Hershey during the Interview

Interview with Phyllis Hershey at her home in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania on July 30, 2002 with Jennifer Elliott as part of the Cumberland County Women During World War Two Oral History Project. Hershey discusses how students would assist the community during black outs and other civil defense drills, working at the Middletown Air Service Depot selling war bonds and collecting health insurance premiums for Blue Cross and later as a teletype operator. Hershey also talks about how German Prisonsers of War would clean the depot each night.

Catharine MacCaffray (Women in World War II)

Catharine MacCaffray instructs Masland Employees on applying bandages

This is an oral history conducted by Steven Burg with Catharine MacCaffray at her home in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on June 20, 2002 as part of the Cumberland County Women During World War Two Oral History Project. MacCaffray discusses her experience as a volunteer nurse's aid for the American Red Cross in various hostitals in Carlisle. MacCaffray further talks about other various experiences including working at C. H. Masland's, seeing German POWs, and rationing.

Dr. Charles M. Worthington (1835-1878)

Scan of Charles M. Worthington's obituary in the American Volunteer on October 17, 1878

A survivor of the infamous Libby Prison, Charles McClure Worthington was a man of many occupations; a telegraph operator on the Cumberland Valley Rail Road, a Civil War surgeon, a druggist, and finally, a Carlisle school teacher. Charles M. Worthington was born in Carlisle on September 22, 1835, the eldest son of Ann and Jefferson Worthington, a painter and County Commissioner. Worthington was educated in the Carlisle schools and read medicine with Dr. Baughman.