Mount Holly Springs

Mt. Holly Springs

Mt Holly Springs,  Elevated Photo circa 1950

Mt. Holly Springs is situated at the northern entrance of a gap in South Mountain in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Mountain Creek flows through this gap and into the borough. This area was once called Holly Gap because of a large holly tree that grew there.

Robert Murray

Image of Robert Murray during Interview

Interview of Bob Murray by Pamela Still on July 30, 2015. The interview focuses on Murray's interest in the history of Mount Holly Springs including his collection of photographs documenting the history of the bourough.

Donald E. Owens Sr.

Donald E. Owens Sr.

This transcript includes portions of the tape that relate to the migration of African-American families to Cumberland County or the Underground Railroad. Donald Owens stated that he heard many of these stories from his grandmother, who raised him. Other portions of the tape contain his memories of events in the 1930s, visits to his uncle’s farm where he helped with butchering, going to school, and jobs that he had. 

Conrad Reep: Mt. Holly Springs Cabinetmaker & Undertaker

Photo of the grave marker of the Reep family in the Mount Holly Springs cemetery

Conrad Reep, his wife Catharine (Lizman) and their two young daughters emigrated from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany in 1848. Reep’s brother-in-law, John Lizman, also from Hess-Darmstadt, had immigrated earlier and was a cabinetmaker in Carlisle. Reep settled in Mount Holly Springs, six miles south of Carlisle. In 1856, he declared his intent to become a citizen and was naturalized on November 10, 1858.

Helen P. Sowers (Women in World War II)

Interview with Helen Sowers at her home in Mt. Holly Springs Pennsylvania on July 15th 2002 as a part of the Cumberland County Women During World War II Oral History Project. Sowers discusses growing up during the Great Depression in Mount Holly Springs, Pennsylvania, working in the C. H. Maslands and Sons factory, and as a volunteer airplane spotter in Mount Holly Springs. Sowers also talks about the difficulty of rationing for a large family.

Pages