Carlisle

Charles L. Brown Part Three

Part three of the interview of Charles L. Brown of Carlisle, Pennsylvania on November 13, 1998 by David Kates. Kates conducted the interview for research on the Desegregation of the Carlisle School District as part of an American Studies Seminar. Interview was digitized from a cassette tape.

Building on a Legacy

Being one of the oldest surviving county historical society in Pennsylvania, the Cumberland County Historical Society (CCHS) has cause for celebration during its 125th anniversary year. Founded in 1874 as the Hamilton Library Association, the Society's first century is recalled by Milton E. Flower in the publication "The First One Hundred Years".

Jim Burgess

Image of Jim Burgess during Interview

Interview of Jim Burgess by Deborah Sweaney on August 5, 2015. The interview focuses on Burgess' early life growing up in Mount Holly Springs and touches on his later career as a school teacher and principal in the Carlisle School District.

John J. and Charlotte Roy Butcher

Charlotte Roy Butcher

John J. Butcher, remembered as “one of Carlisle’s most highly respected colored citizens,” was born enslaved five miles from Winchester, Virginia, around 1832. On his death certificate John Butcher’s father’s name was listed as Frank. His mother’s first and maiden names weren’t recorded. Both of his parents were also born in Virginia.

The Capitol and the College: The Latrobe Connection

In 1793 President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the United States Capitol. This event initiated the construction of a building which the statesmen and political leaders of the day hoped would be a grand monument to the democratic ideals of the young nation. To the extent that this first national government building in the Capital City achieved its lofty objective was due to the creativity and vision of Benjamin Latrobe. He served as architect of the United States Capitol from 1803 to 1813 and again from 1815 to 1817.

Captain William E. Miller: A Worthy Citizen and a Gallant Soldier

The final line of the entry about Captain William E. Miller, in the 1905 Biographical Annals of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, ends with "Such is the record of Capt. William E. Miller, a worthy citizen and a gallant soldier." The biographer begins by telling us Captain Miller is "one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Carlisle."

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